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This Week in Cloud: October 21, 2016

By Atos Apprenda Support

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Welcome to Apprenda’s This Week in Cloud! This is a curated list of the top stories that were published during the past week pertaining to cloud computing, containers, the IoT, acquisitions, product releases, industry studies, and more.

If you’ve got an eye for technology but don’t have the time to keep track of everything cloud, let us give you a hand!

 

Gartner: IT Spending Will Hit $3.5 Trillion In 2017

By Scott Ferguson, October 20th edition of InformationWeek
“Global IT spending is slated to rise slightly in 2017, with enterprises looking to invest about $3.5 trillion on technology in the next year — an increase of 2.9% compared to the estimated figure for 2016, according to Gartner, which released its latest forecast on Wednesday at its Symposium/ITxpo show in Orlando. While the investment increase in not as robust as in past years, it’s better than the current state. IT spending is expected to total $3.4 trillion this year, a decrease of about 0.3% between 2015 and 2016. It appears the decision for the UK to leave the EU — Brexit — caused IT spending to dip in the second half of the year.”

Private Cloud Can Be Cheaper than Public Cloud, Says 451 Research

By Conner Forrest , October 17th edition of TechRepublic
“OpenStack and other commercial private cloud options can beat out public cloud when it comes to overall cost, but only once they reach a certain scale, according to a new Cloud Price Index (CPI) released by 451 Research on Monday. According to a press release, the CPI “analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services.” The tipping point, it found, was when an engineer managed either greater than, or less than, 400 virtual machines.”

Private Cloud Adoption Is Alive and Well

By Jennifer Adams, October 18th edition of Forrester Blog
“While public cloud’s hypergrowth garners a lot of press, we expect opportunities to continue for private cloud solutions. In our recently published Private Cloud Solutions Forecast, 2016 To 2021 (Global) we expect the market to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.0% over the 2016-to-2021 period. Private cloud can provide the speed-to-market and scalability of public cloud, yet with enhanced security. Improved IT infrastructure manageability and flexibility are the key drivers of private cloud adoption. Many regulated industries, such as financial services, will continue to use private cloud due to security and regulatory concerns.”

Clueless CIO Cloud Confusion Continues

By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, October 20th edition of ComputerWorld 
“You have got to be kidding me. At the Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, the research company’s annual enterprise IT conference, Gartner vice president David Mitchell Smith said, “In many ways we’re nowhere nearer understanding what cloud is.” Oh, come on! The year is 2016, but Smith continued, “There are still a lot of gray areas and blurriness in the cloud business.” He thinks 80% of vendors’ “private clouds” aren’t strictly speaking cloud, along with 30% of public cloud services. Listen, if you’re a CIO and you don’t know what a cloud really is by now, then you should be fired.”

Local Vendors Challenge Global Players in Analysis of Europe’s Cloud Market

By Paul Miller, October 18th edition of Forrester Blog
“The hyperscale global clouds seem to crop up pretty much everywhere, these days. But we all know that customer requirements differ, from industry to industry, and from country to country. So… how do they cope, and how do we account for the peculiarities of different markets? Today, we publish our latest take on the public cloud platforms market in Europe: The Forrester Wave™: Enterprise Public Cloud Platforms In Europe, Q4 2016. … The report (my first Wave, so allow me to feel pleased with myself) is, of course, interesting and useful in and of itself. But what’s more interesting, perhaps, is that it’s part of a collaboration that allows Forrester to account for those regional quirks.”

WTF Is a Container?

By Frederic Lardinois, October 16th edition of TechCrunch
“You can’t go to a developer conference today and not hear about software containers: Docker, Kubernetes, Mesos and a bunch of other names with a nautical ring to them. Microsoft, Google, Amazon and everybody else seems to have jumped on this bandwagon in the last year or so, but why is everybody so excited about this stuff? To understand why containers are such a big deal, let’s think about physical containers for a moment. The modern shipping industry only works as well as it does because we have standardized on a small set of shipping container sizes.”

10 New Product Categories Created Exclusively for the Container Era – Part 2

By Janakiram MSV, October 18th edition of Forbes
“In the previous part of this article, we looked at some of the product categories influenced by containers. The second and final part will introduce the evolving product lines such as containerized platforms, storage, networks, logging, and monitoring. Container platforms deliver application lifecycle management of the contemporary cloud native applications. …Products such as Apcera, Apprenda, Deis, Red Hat OpenShift, and Pivotal Cloud Foundry are examples of end-to-end container platforms.”

Creating Operational Security for Kubernetes in the Enterprise

By Dan Domkowski, October 18th edition of the Apprenda Blog
“…As a result, those of us looking to introduce enterprise compliance and governance into Kubernetes have to apply best practice policies and procedures to some new principles, technologies, and DevOps workflows (i.e. mapping security processes to this new and exciting product). In the following paragraphs, I have included some of the processes, policies, and procedures you should be thinking about when looking to operationalize Kubernetes in the enterprise. (You can check out my new video on the topic below too.)”

Docker Drops Anchor in China with Alibaba Cloud Partnership

By Mike Wheatley, October 17th edition of SiliconANGLE
“Docker Inc. is bringing the container phenomenon to China via a partnership with one of its biggest cloud computing providers, Alibaba Cloud. Founded back in 2009, Alibaba Cloud is the cloud computing arm of well-known Chinese e-commerce firm Alibaba Group Holdings Ltd., and claims to be China’s largest public cloud provider. It says it’s entering into a wide-ranging partnership with Docker that will advance the user experience for developers throughout China by providing a mirror of the Docker image store, and also distribution for the Docker Hub on its cloud platform.”

Cisco’s Cloud Whisperer CTO Zorawar Biri Singh Blows Free

By Gavin Clarke, October 14th edition of The Register
“You can’t go to a developer conference today and not hear about software containers: Docker, Kubernetes, Mesos and a bunch of other names with a nautical ring to them. Microsoft, Google, Amazon and everybody else seems to have jumped on this bandwagon in the last year or so, but why is everybody so excited about this stuff? To understand why containers are such a big deal, let’s think about physical containers for a moment. The modern shipping industry only works as well as it does because we have standardized on a small set of shipping container sizes.”

What’s Behind Amazon, Microsoft and Google’s Aggressive Cloud Xxpansions

By Brandon Butler, October 18th edition of Network World
“It wasn’t long ago that the big spectator sport in IaaS cloud computing was to watch a leading provider such as Microsoft or Amazon Web Services announce price cuts and then ready for its rivals to follow suit. The new game in town plays out in a similar way, except now the vendors are matching or one-upping each other with new data centers and cloud computing regions. Throughout the month of October, AWS, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform have all announced plans to build out new regions for their Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud operations.”

Epic Cloud Wars Lead to AWS – VMware Deal

By Maribel Lopez, October 14th edition of Forbes
“…This week, VMware created more confusion and more opportunity around its cloud future by announcing a new partnership with Amazon Web Services (AWS) called VMware Cloud on AWS. It’s a vSphere-based cloud service that brings enterprise-class Software-Defined Data Center (SDDC) software to the AWS cloud. According to VMware, “Customers will be able to run any application across vSphere-based private, public and hybrid cloud environments. It will be delivered, sold and supported by VMware as an on-demand, elastically scalable service and customers will be able to leverage the global footprint and breadth of services from AWS.”

IBM’s Focus on Cloud and Software Isn’t Novel – It’s Survival

By Shaun Nichols, October 18th edition of The Channel
“IBM believes it is closer than ever to returning to overall revenue growth for the first time in more than four years. That’s looking at the whole picture, though: while cloud and software are pulling in the right direction, the corporate goliath’s remaining hardware operations are still looking pretty grim. Big Blue said that with revenues only falling by one per cent on the year-ago quarter, it may soon be able to return to overall growth around a new business model focusing on cloud and analytics services such as Watson. The IT titan has suffered 18 quarters now of revenue decline.”

Microsoft Expands Its Azure Government Cloud

By Frederic Lardinois , October 18th edition of TechCrunch
“Microsoft has long offered U.S. government agencies a special version of its Azure cloud computing platform that has all the necessary certifications to allow federal, state and local agencies to use its services. Today, it’s expanding this service with the launch of a Department of Defense-specific version of Office 365 and Azure, and the launch of two new Azure Government regions is the South West and South Central United states. The new versions of Azure and Office 365 for the Department of Defense (DoD) will run in two new dedicated regions where they are physically isolated from the rest of the Azure platform. Microsoft says these regions will also be connected to the DoD using a private Azure ExpressRoute connection.”

Atos Apprenda Support